Edinburgh World Heritage - News Article

 

The Story of Edinburgh Unveiled in 101 Objects

New visitor experience set to draw tourists to explore the capital


May 3, 2017

Creating a fresh perspective on Edinburgh’s rich narrative of history, culture, heritage and everyday life, Edinburgh’s 101 Objects is a new visitor experience set to bring the city’s colourful, and sometimes dark, past to life through some of its most treasured objects and curiosities.

Launching today, Wednesday 3 May, the city-wide campaign is a first for Edinburgh. 50 partners, including city institutions, attractions, universities, galleries and local pubs, have come together to each showcase their precious objects in celebration of 1000 years of Scotland’s capital city. 80% of the 101 Objects can also be found in venues free to visit.

Running until April 2018, the 12-month campaign forms part of Scotland’s Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology, made possible by a city collaboration on an unprecedented scale. The Edinburgh Tourism Action Group (ETAG), Marketing Edinburgh and Edinburgh World Heritage joined forces with 44 object owners to make Edinburgh’s 101 Objects a reality. Funding support from Virgin Money and a successful application to the VisitScotland Growth Fund has enabled the campaign.

Adam Wilkinson, Director of Edinburgh World Heritage said: “Our experts have carefully selected objects that are both intriguing in themselves and help us tell the wider story of the city and the World Heritage Site over a time span of 1,000 years. The different themes cover all aspects of the city’s extraordinary story and will help everyone discover the objects that they personally find fascinating as well as explore less visited corners of Edinburgh.”

here is the description.St Bernard’s Well is a stunning 18th century neo-classical temple, built over a mineral spring with highly decorative interior pump house. A hidden gem among the foliage on the banks Water of Leith and one of the objects on the list.

From the architectural grandeur of the Scott Monument and the ethereal ceiling in the Thistle Chapel at St Giles’ Cathedral to a 90-year old paint mixer used on the Forth Bridge and a golf ball once owned by Robert Louis Stevenson, every object has been carefully chosen for both their personal intrigue and wider role in the compelling story of the city.

A silver and gold ceremonial mace created for the 1999 opening of the Scottish Parliament.

Seven themes provide a thread through the Edinburgh’s 101 journey through time: Building a City, Faith & Nation; City of Innovation; Arts & Performance; Everyday Life; On the Dark Side and Books, Words, Ideas. A balanced combination of familiar favourites including The Stone of Destiny, Sherlock Holmes statue and Dolly the Sheep, sit along the first Edinburgh International Festival programme from 1947, the 200-year old Sabal palm tree, the original New Town Plan and the Witches Well.

A very intimate and risqué TripAdvisor of its day, the Rangers Impartial List was published anonymously as a “gentleman’s” review of 66 of Edinburgh’s prostitutes. The women’s addresses, ages and appearances are described, along with much euphemism about their skills. This object is housed at the Edinburgh World Heritage offices.

A new website, www.edinburgh.org/101 presents all 101 objects together, providing an entertaining insight both into each object’s personal history and its place within Edinburgh’s gripping story. With each item numbered 1-101, visitors can explore the objects, arranging them by locale or theme, creating a personal visitor experience tailored to their interests.  Designed to be an engaging information resource, the site also acts as a mobile geo-mapped guidebook, enabling visitors to navigate the city and discover the physical objects for themselves.

Edinburgh’s 101 Objects, which celebrates Scotland’s Year of History, Heritage and Archaeology, runs from May 2017-April 2018 in various locations across the city. Visit www.edinburgh.org/101 and follow #Edinburgh101 on Twitter.

Adam Wilkinson, Director of Edinburgh World Heritage said:

Adam Wilkinson, Director of Edinburgh World Heritage said:

“Our experts have carefully selected objects that are both intriguing in themselves and help us tell the wider story of the city and the World Heritage Site over a time span of 1,000 years. The different themes cover all aspects of the city’s extraordinary story and will help everyone discover the objects that they personally find fascinating as well as explore less visited corners of Edinburgh.”

Our experts have carefully selected objects that are both intriguing in themselves and help us tell the wider story of the city and the World Heritage Site over a time span of 1,000 years. The different themes cover all aspects of the city’s extraordinary story and will help everyone discover the objects that they personally find fascinating as well as explore less visited corners of Edinburgh.”



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